• 2014
    SBGrid Logo

    SBGrid Today

    SBGrid Logo

    SBGrid has 245 member laboratories around the world and supports more than 270 scientific software applications. The SBGrid monthly newsletter is distributed to over 2000 structural biologists. Laboratories that joined SBGrid in 2014 include James Berger of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Jue Chen from Rockefeller University, Chloe Zubieta at the IRTSV in France, Jonathan Cohen of Harvard Medical School, and Phoebe Chen from La Trobe University in Australia.

  • 2013
    Open Science Grid Logo

    eLife and XSEDE

    Science April 2012 Cover

    A paper providing a comprehensive description of SBGrid is published in eLife. SBGrid’s Dr. Jason Key becomes a member of the XSEDE Campus Champion program to support the most demanding electron microscopy computations and make high performance computational resources available to the SBGrid community.

  • 2012

    SBGrid Formalizes Charter

    SBGrid rolls out its webinar program featuring software tutorials from a different developer each month. Recordings are publicly available on the YouTube.org/SBGridTV channel. With support from the National Science Foundation SBGrid Policy Fellow, Andrew Morin develops a guide to software licensing (PLoS Compu Biol. 2012;8(7):e1002598) and advocates for better disclosure of source code (Science. 2012 Apr 13;336(6078):159-60.). SBGrid extends software support for pharmaceutical companies with a customized collection of software packages. Membership growth continues at about 28% per year.

  • 2010

    Wide Search Molecular Replacement

    SBGrid establishes a Virtual Organization (SBGrid VO) within the Open Science Grid (OSG) and deploys a grid computing portal. Specialized workflows to perform molecular replacement against 100,000 protein domain structures (Wide Search Molecular Replacement) and low resolution DEN refinement are introduced to all members of the structural biology community. SBGrid becomes one of the top OSG users (outside of high-energy physics users) and utilizes ~5,000,000 CPU hours per year. In 2011 SBGrid hosts the Open Science Grid All-Hands Meeting at Harvard Medical School.

  • 2008

    Quo Vadis Structural Biology?

    SBGrid holds its first user meeting: Quo Vadis Structural Biology? (from Latin: where is structural biology heading?). The meeting attracts approximately 300 participants and incorporates a structural biology symposium and three workshops: scientific programming with Python; molecular visualization with Maya; and OSX programming. SBGrid holds subsequent meetings in Boston (2009, 2013, 2014) and, in collaboration with Daniel Panne from Grenoble, organizes the 2010 EMBO Practical Course: Scientific Programming and Data Visualization for Structural Biology, held in Heidelberg, Germany.

  • 2006

    SBGrid Expands

    SBGrid expands to include 37 laboratories located at 14 different institutions: Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Caltech, Cornell, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Immune Disease Institute, Rice University, Rockefeller University, Rosalind Franklin University, Stanford, Vanderbilt University, Washington University School of Medicine, and Yale University. SBGrid also establishes itself as an HMS NIH-complaint Service Center. The Center develops an end-user licensing agreement (EULA) in cooperation with the Harvard University Office of Technology Development (OTD) to formalize its relationships with Consortium laboratories.

  • 2004

    Support For OSX Introduced

    In response to demand from Mac users, SBGrid re-compiles the majority of its applications to run under OS X. Today approximately 50% of members use Macintosh computers. The initial collection of OS X application was compiled by Dr. David Gohara.

  • 2002

    EM & NMR

    Sliz and Harrison relocate to Harvard Medical School, several additional research groups join SBGrid, and software support is initiated for electron microscopy (EM), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and other structural biology techniques. SBGrid also begins charging user-fees to recover operational costs.

  • 2000

    Harvard/Children's Hospital/Yale

    SBGrid is established by Dr. Piotr Sliz as a home-grown solution to the challenge of supporting and maintaining a few dozen X-ray crystallography applications that run on SGI IRIX and Linux workstations. The first laboratories supported are those of Stephen Harrison and the late Don Wiley, at Harvard University and Children’s Hospital Boston, and Ya Ha and Karin Reinisch at Yale Medical School. This support includes other existing collaborative software projects in X-ray crystallography, including CCP4 and later PHENIX — both of which continue to contribute to SBGrid.